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Ultramicrotomy workshop*

* Sponsored by Electron Microscopy Sciences, Diatome, and Mager Scientific, Inc.

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Agenda

October 28, 2015- Wednesday

1:00pm – 3:00 pm: Gathering, Samples/questions collection and instrument setups in (MC)2

3:00pm – 5:00 pm: Lecture in room 122 Building 18, NCRC

Lecturers: Helmut Gnaegi and Mike Boykin

 

October 29, 2015- Thursday

8:30 am-11:30 am: Hands-on demo in (MC)2

Instructors: Helmut Gnaegi and Mike Boykin

11:30 am – 12:30 pm: Lunch (on your own)

12:30 pm – 2:30pm: Hands-on demo (continued)

Instructors: Helmut Gnaegi and Mike Boykin

2:30 pm -3:00 pm: Wrap-up and closing remark

 

Instructors:

Helmut Gnaegi (helmut.gnaegi@diatome.ch)
Diatome Ltd
http://www.diatome.ch/
Mike Boykin (MBoykin@magersci.com)
Mager Scientific, Inc.
http://www.magersci.com/


 


Atomic Scale in Situ Electron Microscopy: Understand Structure-Property Relationships in Nanomaterials

Friday Oct 16th, 10:30 – 1571 G.G. Brown

Jeorg Jinschek, FEI Company

The strong focus on more efficient energy use and conversion, on more efficient transportation, and on environmental protecting technologies relies heavily on the advancement of (new) functional nanomaterials and nanosystems. At any stage in research and development, studies of these nanomaterials’ structure, properties, and function are critical, including detailed atomic-scale insights. Progress in technology and methodology has made scanning / transmission electron microscopes (S/TEM) powerful and indispensable tools for characterizing nanostructures, e.g. [1-3]. However, studies e.g. at room temperature and/or under standard high vacuum conditions might be inadequate to investigate the actual functional state of a material or system, whose properties depend on varying operating or environmental conditions. Fortunately, in recent years the technology has also been significantly advanced to enable in situ studies while maintaining high-resolution imaging and analytical capabilities when applying in situ stimuli to functional nanomaterials, such as temperature, current, gas etc. For instance, implementation of differential pumping apertures in an aberration corrected TEM [4] enables environmental studies, e.g. oxidation, reduction, or corrosion experiments [5]. In this contribution I will describe the path to have an accurate knowledge and control of experimental conditions in advanced in situ S/TEM experiments [6]. Special attention will be given to the temperature accuracy and uniformity provided by MEMS-based heating stages and the image resolution and sensitivity in ETEM gas environments [4]. Recent application examples will be presented to highlight these in situ S/TEM capabilities [5-7].

[1] J. R. Jinschek, et al., Carbon 49, 556 (2011)

[2] D. Van Dyck, et al., Nature 486, 243 (2012)

[3] K. Urban, et al., PRL 110, 185507 (2013)

[4] J. R. Jinschek, et al., Micron 43, 1156 (2012)

[5] J. R. Jinschek, Chemical Communications 50, 2696 (2014)

[6] S. Helveg, et al., Micron 68, 176 (2015)

[7] H. Yoshida, et al., Science 335, 317 (2012)


John Mansfield, named Senior Director of Education and Engagement

In 1987, Dr. John Mansfield joined the University of Michigan as the laboratory manager of the north campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory (EMAL) and then, from 2005 as the laboratory manager and associate director, successfully growing an initially small transmission electron microscopy facility with 3 TEMs and 1 XPS system, into a much larger materials characterization facility currently serving over 450 users. Beyond the technical expertise and support on the instruments, the Center is now looking to broaden its mission to include education and experiential learning in advanced materials characterization.  In his new role as the Senior Director of Education and Engagement, Dr. Mansfield will teach a graduate level electron microscopy course, and a series of tutorial seminars targeting new students, industrial researchers, and users looking to expand their knowledge base about advanced electron microscopy, diffraction and spectroscopy techniques. He will also organize outreach events and develop the framework for a future (MC)2 certificate program in materials characterization.


Enabling New Research in Life Sciences – AFM Technology Seminar & Demonstration

Sept. 16 | Room 4234, Medical Science I Building, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine St.

The University of Michigan is hosting a complimentary BioAFM workshop featuring Bruker’s new BioScope Resolve AFM. This workshop will focus on biomechanics, high-resolution imaging and a new level of seamless AFM and inverted optical microscope integration. Join us for informative talks and hands-on demonstrations. Register to reserve a seat and book your own time slot with the new instrument and Bruker Applications Experts.

WORKSHOP AGENDA

Wednesday, September 16th (Room 4234)

9:00 – 9:30 Welcome and Introduction – Chris Getz, Regional Representative, Bruker

9:30 – 10:30 Advancing AFM for Cell Biology: From High-Resolution Imaging to Quantitative Nanomechanical Property Mapping of Living Cells – Dr. Marcin Walkiewicz, Applications Scientist, Bruker

10:30 – 11:30 Group demonstration of the Bioscope Resolve AFM – Dr.Marcin Walkiewicz

11:30 – 1:00 Lunch – sponsored by Bruker for workshop attendees

1:00 – 4:00 Hands-on Time – Measurement of samples based on reservation with Chris Getz (chris.getz@bruker.com)

REGISTER ONLINE: www.bruker.com/BNS-NA_workshops

RESERVE TIME ON BIOSCOPE RESOLVE: chris.getz@bruker.com