MMMS 2017

Wednesday November 1st 2017

Michigan Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (MMMS) & (MC)2 Open Day 

Registration Fees:

Supporting Manufacturer/Vendor $100

Full Attendee $65

Student $20

Register here!

Presentations, Tour, Poster and image competition. Keynote presentations include:

  • Determining atomic structure across scale & dimensions with highly convergent electron beamsProf. Robert Hovden, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan
  • Using cryo-electron microscopy to visualize the function of PMP22, a major cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD)Prof. Melanie Ohi, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan
  • Shaping (and reshaping) biological membrane architecture for vertebrate photoreceptor health (and disease)Prof. Andrew Goldberg, Biomedical Sciences, Oakland University
  • Ultrasonic Fatigue and its role in Materials Centric Design, Dr. Jason W. Carroll, Eaton Corporation.
  • Micro-Raman analyses of Earth and Planetary Materials: Advantages and Challenges, Prof. Jackie Li, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan

Submit an abstract (deadline: October 10th 2017) 

 

Address: 2800 Plymouth, Rd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109

Change in Center Directorship

As of June 2020, Dr. Emmanuelle Marquis has retired from her position as center director, with Dr. Alan Taub taking on the next directorship. We would like to thank Dr. Marquis for her innovation and service over the last five years of leadership, as she worked tirelessly to bring in cutting-edge new equipment, upgrade existing instruments, standardize training processes, and expand the range of techniques in the center’s repertoire. 

We welcome Dr. Taub, MSE professor and senior technology advisor for LIFT (Lightweight Innovations for Tomorrow), who brings a background in industry research and development to this role.  Dr. Taub is also the director of the new Michigan Materials Research Institute, in which (MC)2 looks forward to playing a key part.  The institute will become a central point of contact between the university, industry, and federal sponsors to collaborate on interdisciplinary materials science research. 


Image Contest Winners Announced

Congratulations to the winners of our latest image contest! Thank you to all who submitted. 

1st Place

Rigel Hanbury, “Faceted Crystallites” (Thermo Fisher Nova 200 Nanolab SEM/FIB)

 

This is a secondary electron image of outer oxide particles formed on 316L stainless steel exposed to 320ºC hydrogenated water for 72 hours to simulate nuclear reactor core corrosion. These particles derive their crystallographic orientation from the underlying metal yielding common facets among separate particles. 

 

 

 

Runners-up:

Li-Jen Yu, “Doodle Drawing by an Alloy” (JEOL 2100F TEM)

 

A recolored STEM (scanning transmission electron microscope) image of dislocation loops and defects in an irradiated Ni-Cr alloy. Excessive point defects such as vacancies and interstitials are created in the alloy after irradiation. Once interstitials accumulate on certain crystallographic planes, dislocation loops can form. These dislocation loops can significantly affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. 

 

 

 

 

Insung Han, “Dried Flowers (Thermo Fisher Helios 650 Nanolab SEM/FIB)

 

Metastable Al-Mn quasicrystals formed by short-pulse laser irradiation, modified to show the dendrites’ resemblance to blooming flowers.

 

 

 

 

 

Ziwen Zhu, “Circulating tumor cell interacting with cancer associated fibroblast derived extracellular matrix” (Thermo Fisher Nova 200 Nanolab SEM/FIB)

 

This is an organoid model we built for circulating tumor cell. CTC was captured by the extracellular matrix and grown with cancer associated fibroblast together.


Image Contest Open Until 5/18

The (MC)2 image contest is accepting submissions once again through Monday, May 18. The contest is open to all lab users who are graduate students and post-docs at U-M or other universities. Images must be obtained using an instrument at the center and may (but do not have to be) artistically modified. While we are looking forward to the time we can return to operations and see you all back in the lab, we hope that you will share with us some of your favorite micrographs from this past year of research with us. 

Center staff will select one winning image and three runners-up to be framed and displayed in our office area. These and other images will also be featured in the ongoing photo collage in the Building 22 hallway outside the lab space. Once all spots in the collage have been filled, we plan to add an informational plaque. 

To enter, click here

Please upload the highest quality image you can with regard to file size, bit depth, and resolution. Preferred image width is 1024 px or above and in .tif format. You are welcome to submit multiple entries if you would like.

All submissions should include the following:

  • A title for the image
  • A clear and detailed legend
  • A short paragraph describing the scientific context
  • Explanation of any artistic modification of the image (if relevant)

Participants grant the center permission to use their images in the future in various forms, such as brochures, educational materials for other users, or featuring on our website or other media.


Image Contest Winners

Congratulations to the winners of our third user image contest! The next contest will be held in spring 2020. 

1st PlaceAhmet Emre, “The Social Network” (FEI Helios 650 Nanolab SEM/FIB)

 

 

The image is of methylated DNA, aesthetically edited to represent colorful social network nodes and ties.

 

 

 

 

Runners-Up:

Kathleen Chou, “Bubble Wrap” (FEI Helios for FIB Tomography, Avizo software)

 

 

This is a focused ion beam tomography reconstruction of a Titanium-Niobium alloy with elevated oxygen content obtained using an oxidation exposure showing rod shaped omega precipitates. Precipitates are outlined as nano bubbles in the reconstruction using Avizo software.

 

 

Nicole Olson, “Soccer Balls” (FEI Helios 650 Nanolab SEM/FIB)

 

 

 

Brochosomes are submicron granules excreted from insects in the family Cicadellidae. These waxy, hydrophobic compounds help keep the insect body dry. 

 

 

 

 

Saman Moniri, “Faceted Spiral” (Micropillar prepared on FEI Helios 650 Nanolab)

The image shows a close-up view of a spiral eutectic colony in the Zn-Mg alloy system. The microstructure of the spiral was examined in 3D via x-ray nano tomography, and the analysis (segmentation) was performed with machine learning. A spiral colony is extracted, and its surrounding is rendered translucent orange for clarity. The gradation in the spiral’s color is due to the false coloring scheme used for visual clarity. The 3D reconstruction provides a wealth of information: (i) the outline of the colony is hexagonal (green overlay) throughout, indicating that the crystallographic anisotropy of the eutectic MgZn2 phase plays an important role during solidification; (ii) the spirals are characterized by an intra facet angle ϕ = 10° (black lines) and a dihedral angle 2θ = 18°; (iii) the spiral is terminated at a common nucleation (determined to be a polytetrahedral phase); and (iv) the spiraling lamellae form continuous, parallel sheets of uniform thickness.


Fall Image Contest Open

(MC)2 invites users to submit to our fall image contest between now and Tuesday, November 19. The contest is open to all graduate students and post-docs at U-M or other universities. Images must be obtained using an instrument at the center and may be artistically modified if you choose.  

As we have previously, center staff will select one winning image and three runners-up to frame and display in our office area. Others may also be featured in the ongoing photo collage in the hallway outside the (MC)2 office. Once the collage has been filled, we plan to add an informational plaque.

The first-place winner will also receive a $50 gift card to a local restaurant of their selection, and runners-up $25 gift cards.

To enter, click here

Please upload the highest quality image you can with regard to file size, bit depth, and resolution. Preferred image width is 1024 px or above and in .tif format. You are welcome to submit multiple entries if you would like, and we will automatically include all non-winning entries from past contests for consideration.

All submissions should include the following:

  • A title for the image
  • A clear and detailed legend
  • A short paragraph describing the scientific context
  • Explanation of any artistic modification of the image (if relevant)

Participants grant the center permission to use their images in the future in various forms, such as brochures, educational materials for other users, or featuring on our website or other media.

 


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